Placemaking 4 Inclusion: Comparative National Report

Placemaking 4 Inclusion: Comparative National Report

Welcome to Placemaking 4 Inclusion (PM4I), a dynamic initiative funded by the European Union. This extract, which captures the theory by transforming it into practice, is from the Comparative National Report, weaving insights from Germany, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Greece, and Norway. PM4I empowers youth and organizations, using placemaking to foster social inclusion and shape inclusive urban environments through collaborative co-creation. Explore key chapters on Methodology, Placemaking, Youth Social Inclusion, Community Empowerment, and Competences. Dive into this treasure trove of insights, sparking positive change. Join us on this journey, embrace placemaking principles, and be part of reshaping societies for the better.

You can read the full report here: http://placemaking.4learning.eu/outputs/

Resource related to

Urban strategies

Citizen cooperation

Urban pedagogy

 

Editorial team

*estel (Konstantina

Chrysostomou , Arnau Boix i

Pla, Nedjine Dorcely)

 

Luisa Tuttolomondo (Sguardi

Urbani), Anna Stamouli

(AKNOW), Ammalia

Podlaszewska (CGE), Bram

Dewolfs (Urban Foxes),

Annabel Mempel

(Nabolagshager), Rita

Marques (YEU)

 

They have collaborated

Youngsters, youth workers,

youth organizations and local

authorities from Germany,

Belgium, Italy, Norway, Spain

and Greece

More Information

Publication date

04/12/2023

Socio-Territorial Analysis in the Urban Landscape Study of Sants

Socio-Territorial Analysis in the Urban Landscape Study of Sants

The “Human Landscape of Sants” project is part of the Urban Landscape Study of Sants and aims to analyze and improve public space and quality of life in the district of Sants, Barcelona.

The project’s methodology is divided into two working groups: direct and indirect participation. Direct participation includes preliminary conversations with the involved stakeholders, such as technicians from the 4 neighborhoods, and citizen debates with individuals and local entities linked to the project. On the other hand, indirect participation is based on the observation of urban dynamics and fieldwork.

The project’s scope focuses on the district of Sants, which includes the neighborhoods of Sants, Badal, La Bordeta, and Hostafrancs. The project seeks to understand the collective identity of the people living in this area, highlighting the strong social network and the sense of community belonging.

The project also aims to analyze the structuring elements that shape everyday life in public spaces. Key spaces and facilities, such as parks, squares, and other meeting places, are identified, as well as the importance of activities carried out in these spaces. The diversity of uses and the presence of people of different ages, genders, and cultures are observed.

Additionally, a study is conducted on the typology of public spaces and streets in the area, emphasizing transit areas and neighborhood boundaries. The use of public space and its functionality are analyzed.

Finally, the perception of comfort, autonomy, and safety in public spaces is evaluated. The distribution of space, bicycle infrastructure, accessibility for people with disabilities, and vehicle speed are observed. Climate protection, the presence of urban greenery and water surfaces, lighting, and visibility are also considered. Overall, the space is identified as safe and inclusive, but there are areas with social conflicts that are highlighted.

Place

Barcelona 

[1,620,343 inhabitants]

Scale

District

Type of project

Urban Strategies

Citizen cooperation

Duration

10 months [2022-2023]

Promoter

Municipality of Barcelona

Institut del Paisatge Urbà

(Urban Landscape Institute)

 

Team

B2B Arquitectes (Jordi

Bellmunt, Agata Buscemi)

Irbis, *estel (Konstantina

Chrysostomou,Marc Deu),

Fàtima López, Montserrat

Mercadé, Veclus S.L.

 

Collaborators

Technicians of the

neighborhoods: Sants, La

Bordeta, Sants-Badal,

Hostafrancs

Neighborhood entities and

collectives: Sants, La Bordeta,

Sants-Badal, Hostafrancs

Gender perspective and participation consultancy in the East-West pedestrian routes project of Cabanyal

Gender perspective and participation consultancy in the East-West pedestrian routes project of Cabanyal

Gender urban planning places everyday life at the center and provides an inclusive vision to address the needs of the neighborhood’s residents. The goal is for the proposal to resolve the current urban inequalities and meet the needs of men and women equally, without discrimination based on gender or any other factors such as economic, origin, age, functional diversity, etc. The proposed urban transformation aims to create new spaces that will serve as the physical support for future social uses. Therefore, it is essential to analyze and design them while considering the actions people perform in their daily lives and embracing their diversity.

In this regard, several actions have been taken to incorporate this perspective into the project:

  • Direct and ongoing guidance to the project team in decision-making.
  • Analysis of gender-related documents in the territory provided by the administration or identified by the team.
  • Group interviews: To present and discuss the gender-focused project approach and criteria, review previously identified relevant documents, and include others that the participants deem important.

The guidance includes the main conclusions derived from the gender analysis affecting the project’s scope, and it outlines the project’s work lines and strategies that address the integration of the gender perspective.

Place

Valencia

[1.923.000 inhabitants]

Scale

Neighborhood

Type of project

Citizen cooperation

Public space design

Duration

3 months [2022]

Promoter

Municipality of Valencia

EDUSI Cabanyal – Canyamelar

– Cabo de Francia

European Regional

Development Fund

 

Team

*estel (Alba Domínguez

Ferrer, Arnau Boix Pla,

Konstantina Chrysostomou,

Marc Deu Ferrer)

PEÑIN ARQUITECTOS, SLP

 

Collaborators

Cabanyal Neighborhood

Neighborhood Union

Feminist Assembly

Brúfol Association

Cabanyal-Canyamelar

Neighborhood Association

From the Courtyard to the

Neighborhood

Santiago Apostol School

Exhibition: 50 Years of Women’s Football in Manresa. The Women’s Struggle in the World of Sports

Exhibition: 50 Years of Women's Football in Manresa.
The Women's Struggle in the World of Sports

“Sports have historically been predominantly practiced by men. Despite being more than half of the world’s population, women have had to earn the right to participate in sports. In Manresa, fifty years ago, a group of girls decided to play football when it was still considered a men’s sport, initially to raise some money for their end-of-year trip, and later as part of a team: SOFFMIC, which competed in the I Women’s Football Championship of Catalonia, Pernod Cup. Taking advantage of this anniversary, the exhibition traces the history of women’s sports in Manresa from the 1970s to the present…”

This is the introduction that opens the exhibition, which goes beyond commemorating fifty years of women’s football in Manresa. It seeks to showcase many pioneering Manresean women in various sports to the present day and also challenges the exhibition’s visitors to consider whether the progress made in recent years is enough to achieve gender equality in the world of sports.

This project has designed the exhibition layout and has conceptualized all the materials collected by the Women’s Group FF 1970-1971 to create a temporary exhibition with the goal of visibility, raising awareness, and, above all, prompting the audience to reflect. The ultimate intention is for the visitor to be more than just a passive observer but an active participant in the exhibition, using mechanisms of participation and interaction with the materials used.

Place

Manresa 

[77.452 inhabitants]

Scale

Municipal

Type of project

Urban pedagogy

Duration

6 months [2021-2022]

Promoter

Women’s Group FF 1970-1971

(Àngels Arrufat Dalmau,

Mercè Maeso Delgado, Cloti

Morales Coca, Núria Zueras

Avellana)

 

Municipality of Manresa

 

Team

*estel (Alba Domínguez Ferrer)

Muntant Arquitectura  (Clara

Casas Arrufat)

 

Collaborators

Women’s Group FF 1970-1971,

SIAD, El Casino Library,

Women’s and LGTB+ Affairs

Council, Sports Council, Culture

Council, Manresa Comarcal

Archive, Porquet Prat Signs,

REMSA, Club Atlético Manresa,

Egiba Gymnastics Club, Manresa

Swimming Club, Manresa Tennis

Club, Gimnàstic Manresa,

Manresa Sports Center, Catalan

Football Federation, SQUADRA,

Montserrat Margarit Costa,

Margarita Martínez Figueras,

Jordi Serra Morales, Foto-Art,

Serra Morales Family. Thanks to

all individuals for providing

photos and information, and to

the media that allowed us to use

the news.

Press

Read more about the project at:

regio7

naciodigital 

manresadiari

fcf.cat

Participation process associated with the Punctual Modification of the PGO of Can Coll in Torrelles de Llobregat

Participation process associated with the Punctual Modification of the PGO of Can Coll in Torrelles de Llobregat

The planning process is complex and often slower than we would like. This is the case of the Can Coll sector, an area of ​​mainly residential development on the edge of Torrelles de Llobregat and in contact with Non-Developable Land. This is an environment that is not finished running for various reasons.

In 2019, the Metropolitan Area of ​​Barcelona (AMB) in collaboration with Torrelles de Llobregat City Council began drafting the Modification of the General Planning Plan (MPGO) in order to find a solution that consolidates this area and allow this process to be closed, minimizing the environmental impact and the inconvenience to the residents of the town.

It is in this context that this participatory process has been carried out, with the aim that this new MPGO allows responding to the needs of all those affected, both those who currently live in the area and those of the rest of the town.

One of the strong points of the project has been to clarify the information and make it reach as many people as possible, thus generating a space for debate from which to guarantee the possibility of getting involved and thus participating in the decision-making process. To this end, various open actions (informative and deliberative), sectoral meetings, online participation channels or an exhibition at the Ateneu Torrellenc, among others, have been held.

Place

Torrelles de Llobregat

[6.186 inhabitants]

Scale

Municipal

Type of project

Citizen cooperation

Duration

4 months [2021]

Promoter

Municipality of Torrelles de

Llobregat

 

Team

*estel (Marc Deu Ferrer,

Konstantina Chrysostomou,

Alba Domínguez Ferrer,

Arnau Boix i Pla)

 

Collaborators

Neighbors of Torrelles de

Llobregat

Government Measure and Study of gender inequalities in municipal facilities and spaces

Government Measure and Study of gender inequalities in municipal facilities and spaces

Government measures are an informational tool of the municipal government that present actions of general interest. In this case, the Government Measure aims to integrate a gender perspective into the design and management of municipal facilities and their surroundings. Its objectives are:

  • Provide criteria for incorporating a gender perspective into the design of public facilities.
  • Establish processes, references, and regulations for introducing this perspective into the design and evaluation of public facilities.
  •  Define and provide tools for the inclusion of a gender perspective in  public facility design.

In this way, the goal is to create accessible and versatile buildings for various activities, with a special focus on increasing green areas and lactation spaces, as well as the incorporation of furniture adapted for everyone. Through this Measure, a network of municipal restrooms and care spaces will be promoted, along with the creation of protocols to prevent and address gender-based violence. Additionally, the aim is to make the indoor spaces of the facilities comfortable, well-lit, with natural ventilation, and good sound insulation, all accompanied by clear and well-structured layouts to facilitate their use.

This initiative arises from a study that highlights a gender gap in the use of facilities, with an unequal trend towards feminization. Revealing data shows that women use certain facilities more than men, such as neighborhood daily consumption stores, specialized establishments, banks, primary care centers, senior centers, educational institutions, social service centers, and libraries.

To ensure an objective approach, a new methodology for the study and evaluation of existing facilities has been proposed, as well as recommendations for future designs. This measure represents a significant step towards a more inclusive and egalitarian society where all individuals can enjoy equitable access and use of municipal facilities, regardless of their gender.

Place

Barcelona

[1,620,343 inhabitants]

Scale

Municipal

Type of project

Urban Strategies


Urban pedagogy

Duration

6 months [2021]

Promoter

Barcelona City Council’s

Department of Gender

Services and Times Policies

 

Commission for Social Rights,

Culture and Sports (Municipal

Council of Barcelona)

 

Barcelona Regional Urban

Development Agency, S.A.

 

Team

*estel (Alba Domínguez Ferrer,

Konstantina Chrysostomou,

Marc Deu Ferrer, Arnau Boix i Pla)

 

Barcelona Regional Urban

Development Agency, S.A.

(Ana Paricio Cárceles,

Conchi Berenguer Urrutia)

Study

Read the full report at bcnroc

 

Press

Read more about the project

at www.barcelona.cat

Poligoneres: Diagnosis. Gender Justice in the Industrial Areas on the Right Bank of the Besòs

Poligoneres: Diagnosis.
Gender Justice in the Industrial Areas on the Right Bank of the Besòs

“Poligoneres” is a study that focuses on the industrial areas in the right bank of the Besòs River, including Bon Pastor, Torrent d’Estadella, la Verneda Industrial, and Montsolís. The industrial areas in the right bank of the Besòs require a comprehensive intervention with a gender-inclusive perspective to promote the transformation of urban spaces in terms of accessibility and safety. This transformation aims to ensure that everyone can work, use these industrial areas, and move around the area with full autonomy and equal opportunities. Moreover, it is essential to progressively shift towards an economic model with innovative and social criteria, placing elements of feminist economics at the forefront. This includes promoting quality employment for women, supporting women’s entrepreneurship, and increasing their participation in traditionally male-dominated sectors, thus empowering them within society. Furthermore, it is crucial to ensure that caregiving and other life-sustaining work can be carried out under the best conditions.

Therefore, the strategic objective of “Poligoneres” is twofold: on one hand, it aims to bring about a transformation of the public spaces within the industrial areas based on an urbanism of everyday life. On the other hand, it seeks to make these industrial areas engines for gender justice in the economic world. 

Collaboration in this study is structured into three support blocks: research, writing, and representation.

Place

Barcelona

[1,620,343 inhabitants]

Scale

District

Type of project

Urban Strategies

Urban pedaogy

Duration

5 months [2020-2021]

Promoter

Gender Services and Time

Policy Department, Barcelona

City Council


Barcelona Regional Urban

Development Agency, S.A

 

Team

*estel (Alba Domínguez Ferrer,

Arnau Boix i Pla

Konstantina Chrysostomou,

Marc Deu Ferrer)

 


Barcelona Regional Urban

Development Agency, S.A

(Ana Paricio Cárceles)

Study

Read the full report at

bcnroc

Festivals in Public Space

The soul of the city
Festivals in public space

“A part of what has characterized life in European cities has taken place in their open public spaces. The public space has not been the negative space of homes but the positive space of the city. Public space has emerged, it has been created to be the place of assembly, the market, the celebration, justice, theater, work, play, encounter, conversation, religion, carnival, music…” – Jan Gehl

Public space, as noted by Jan Gehl, has been the backdrop of a rich and diverse urban life over the centuries. It has been a place where the community gathers, celebrates, and becomes part of the city’s history. In this ode to public space, we will explore the importance of using this space for celebrations and festivals, with a particular focus on how these events shape public space and transform it into a living platform for culture, diversity, and collective identity.

Public space is more than urban infrastructure; it is a place where life takes shape and experiences are shared. Festivals in public space enrich the city and breathe life into the collective imagination. These celebrations not only configure the physical space but also endow it with new meaning, utilizing the opportunities it provides.

Events held in public space become true manifestations of gathering and community. People from all corners of the city converge there, turning strangers into friends in this festive and celebratory atmosphere. This meeting promotes community cohesion and fosters social interaction, as participants share a sense of unity and belonging to a common space. Festivals in public space are not isolated events but become points of encounter and connection between neighbors and visitors, weaving a community network that unites people from different backgrounds.

Furthermore, these events also serve as vehicles for culture and tradition. Many festivals celebrated in public space are inherently linked to local culture and traditions. From musical performances to traditional attire and specific rituals, these celebrations help preserve and transmit the rich cultural heritage of the community. Through music, dance, performances, and other cultural elements, the identity and roots of the community are highlighted, allowing these traditions to continue to thrive through the generations.

Diversity and inclusion are also fundamental values that are evident in public space celebrations. These celebrations offer an opportunity for people of all kinds, regardless of their ethnic background, religion, social class, or other characteristics, to celebrate together. Public space becomes a place where differences fade away, and people come together to enjoy a prejudice-free and barrier-free celebration environment. This dimension of inclusion and diversity promotes a deeper and more respectful understanding of different cultures and encourages peaceful coexistence and the acceptance of diversity within society.

 

Examples of Public Space Festivities

Carnival in Brazil

Public space becomes crucial for the Carnival celebrations in Brazil, as it is the main stage where this celebration comes to life and significance. Carnival is a rich cultural manifestation deeply rooted in the country’s history, with its origins in the colonial era and the interaction between indigenous, African, and European cultures. In this sense, public space becomes the area of maximum expression of this cultural and religious diversity.

Author Emanuelle Kierulff explores how different samba schools occupy and define public spaces through their parades and celebrations, thus shaping the urban and territorial space of different neighborhoods. The samba school parades become true public spectacles that use the main streets of the cities, emphasizing and reclaiming these spaces as venues for cultural expression. Furthermore, Carnival street parties are the setting where the city’s inhabitants can participate in and experience this cultural expression as direct actors.

In this sense, public space is not merely a backdrop for Carnival celebrations; it becomes an active protagonist that shapes the cultural identity of local communities. This transformation of public space into a place of celebration, encounter, and cultural expression is essential for the continuity and evolution of this important Brazilian festival, highlighting the importance of public space as a stage and cultural mediator in celebrations worldwide.


Las Fallas in Valencia

Las Fallas in Valencia is an iconic and emblematic celebration that highlights the importance of public space in the city’s life and culture. This festival, with its ephemeral artistic monuments and fireworks shows, unfolds in every corner of Valencia, turning public space into a collective stage where cultural and social communion takes place. The streets, squares, and small plazas become meeting places where Valencians and visitors come together to enjoy this unique celebration.

The Fallas festival, with its deep roots and strong connections to Valencia’s history, serves as a paradigmatic example of how public space becomes a stage for cultural and social expression. This is where art, tradition, and creativity are manifested, as local and foreign artists work to build the magnificent monuments that will be burned in a spectacular fire ceremony after a few days. Public space in Valencia comes to life with cultural events during this festival, and Las Fallas would not be what they are without their intrinsic relationship with the city’s streets and squares.


Patum in Berga, Catalonia

Public space plays a fundamental role in the celebration of the Patum de Berga, a traditional and ancient festival declared Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO. The Plaza de San Pedro and other streets and squares in Berga become the main stage where this festival comes to life. As mentioned by Richard Sennett, public space is the stage for the festival, the place where the community gathers to celebrate its cultural roots. The layout and configuration of Berga’s public space allow the different “collas” or groups participating in the Patum to perform their traditional acts and dances with precision and spectacle. Public space becomes the soul of the festival, where social interaction and connection with local culture are possible. This celebration is a vivid example of how public space can be a platform for the preservation and transmission of cultural traditions, connecting people with their history and the roots of their past.


Holi, India

Public space in India plays a crucial role in the celebration of Holi, the festival of colors that is one of the country’s most iconic celebrations. Holi is a commemoration of spring and the victory of good over evil. The streets and squares of cities and towns become the main stage for this festival, where people gather to throw vibrant colored powders, dance, sing, and share joy.

Public space becomes a meeting place and a focal point for the community during Holi, where social and economic differences disappear, and people of all backgrounds can participate in the celebration. This festive event promotes community cohesion and offers the opportunity to promote India’s own culture and traditions, contributing to their continuity and enrichment.

The use of public space during Holi reflects the deep-rooted nature of this festival in the everyday lives of people in India. Additionally, public space becomes a witness to the diversity and inclusion that characterize this celebration, as people from different backgrounds come together to enjoy a festival that celebrates life, fertility, and unity. It is in India’s public space that Holi comes to full fruition and becomes a living manifestation of the country’s culture and identity.


Qualities of Public Space

Therefore, a good public space for hosting festivities or celebrations worldwide must meet several important requirements. The key elements necessary include:

  • Spaciousness and Accessibility: The space must be large enough to accommodate festivities and should be accessible to people with reduced mobility, with clear access and exit routes for emergencies.
  • Platforms or Stages: Temporary platforms or stages are often needed for participants to carry out their performances.
  • Adequate Lighting: If the event takes place at night, it is essential that the space has proper lighting to ensure safety and visibility.
  • Information and Assistance Points: Establish information and assistance points with qualified personnel focused on addressing emergency situations or assisting individuals who may feel insecure. These points can provide information on how to navigate the event safely and serve as locations to collect incident reports.
  • Spectator Areas: The public space must have designated areas where spectators can safely watch the performances without interfering with the participants.
  • Basic Services: Facilities such as public restrooms, water points, and emergency services (such as medical personnel and security personnel) should be available to all participants.
  • Safe Design: The space should be designed to ensure the safety of participants and spectators. This may include safety barriers, signage, and controlled access.
  • Cleaning and Waste Collection: Authorities should coordinate cleaning and waste collection services to ensure that the public space remains clean and safe during and after the event.
  • Public Transportation Accessibility: A good public space should be easily accessible via public transportation to facilitate the participation of people from outside the area.

Public space festivities are living witnesses to culture, tradition, and diversity. These events not only configure the physical space but also transform it into a platform for community cohesion and inclusion. Celebrations such as the Rio Carnival, the Fallas of Valencia, the Patum of Berga, and Holi in India demonstrate how public space can be a place of gathering and celebration where diversity is celebrated. These festivals make public space come alive, changing and becoming essential for city life, and reminding everyone that the streets are not just for traffic but for community and culture.

 

* References 

  • Ferri, L. (2007). Las Fallas de Valencia. Un análisis desde la perspectiva urbana. Cuadernos de estudios urbanos y regionales, 8(19), 97-118.
  • Porcar, A. M. (2014). Las Fallas de Valencia y el patrimonio cultural. Apuntes desde la antropología urbana. Revista d’etnologia de Catalunya, (39), 26-35.
  • Richard Sennett, “The Uses of Disorder: Personal Identity and City Life.”
  • Patum de Berga, “Declaració de la Patum com a Patrimoni Cultural Immaterial de la Humanitat per la UNESCO.”
Photo: Konstantina Chrysostomou, 2017

Words of:

Konstantina Chrysostomou

Publication date:

13/10/2023

Originally written in:


Catalan

Tags:

Everyday life / Public space

Embracing Diversity

Embracing Diversity
The Role of Public Spaces in a Changing World

In a world marked by constant change, where the lines between migration and rootedness blur, and where the intersection of identities weaves a complex tapestry, we find ourselves in a time of both harmonization and dissonance. We are, as Amin Maalouf suggests, all in a sense migrants, navigating a universe that bears little resemblance to the place of our birth. Our identities, once solid and unchanging, are now fluid and evolving throughout our lifetimes.

As Wilhelm Reich profoundly stated, “You think the end justifies the means, however vile. I tell you: the end is the means by which you achieve it. Today’s step is tomorrow’s life. Great ends cannot be attained by base means. You’ve proved that in all your social upheavals. The meanness and inhumanity of the means make you mean and inhuman and make the end unattainable.” Reich’s words emphasize the profound link between the means and the ends in the journey of identity. It’s a reminder that the path we choose matters as much as the destination.

The concept of identity, deeply intertwined with the idea of migration, is in a state of constant flux. We are shaped not only by our roots but by the environments we find ourselves in. Identity is a construct that continually adapts as we encounter new cultures, languages, and ideas. As Maalouf points out, being a migrant is not limited to those who have been forced to leave their native lands; it now encompasses a broader definition. We all must learn new languages, adapt to different modes of speech, and internalize codes that are alien to our original identities.

This process of evolving identity often leaves us feeling torn, caught between the land we left and the land we’ve embraced. Embracing a new culture is not an act of betrayal, but a complex negotiation that involves navigating a range of emotions. The new culture may be one of rejection, a response to repression, insecurity, or lack of opportunity. Yet, the act of leaving behind a part of one’s identity, even when it is rooted in challenging circumstances, carries a sense of guilt and sadness.

However, the essence of a harmonious society lies in the acceptance of all identities. As Maya Angelou eloquently puts it, “We all should know that diversity makes for a rich tapestry, and we must understand that all the threads of the tapestry are equal in value no matter what their color.” Diversity is not just a matter of ethnicity or race but also encompasses gender, religion, language, sexual orientation, and more.

Public spaces, those shared realms where communities intersect and coexist, play a pivotal role in fostering diversity and promoting antiracism. These spaces serve as the common ground where individuals of various backgrounds, cultures, and identities come together. In public spaces, the lines that separate us based on ethnicity, race, or other characteristics begin to blur, as the shared experience of coexisting takes precedence.

Jane Jacobs, in her timeless work “The Death and Life of Great American Cities,” emphasizes the significance of well-designed urban areas. Cities have the potential to provide something for everybody, but only when they are created collaboratively. A harmonious city is characterized by clear boundaries between public and private spaces, with buildings oriented toward streets and sidewalks continuously bustling with activity. This inclusivity is the key to making cities vibrant and livable.

Public spaces, whether bustling city squares, serene parks, or vibrant neighborhoods, offer an opportunity for individuals to engage with one another. This engagement, often spontaneous and unscripted, allows people to witness the surrounding diversity, breaking down stereotypes and prejudices. The mere act of sharing a public space fosters a sense of interconnectedness, promoting empathy, understanding, and appreciation of different cultures and identities.

Moreover, these spaces provide a platform for the expression of diverse identities. Cultural events, festivals, and gatherings in public spaces celebrate a rich tapestry of traditions, languages, and customs. They become a testament to the beauty of diversity, showcasing the value of different perspectives and experiences.

In our quest to honor diversity and promote antiracism, public spaces offer a critical arena for change. Angela Y. Davis reminds us that in a racist society, it’s not enough to be non-racist; we must actively be anti-racist. This means challenging systemic prejudices and working towards a more inclusive society. In this process, the personal becomes political as we confront the ideologies that underlie racism and repression. The very design and utilization of public spaces can either perpetuate racial inequalities or challenge them.

By creating inclusive and accessible public spaces, we send a powerful message that all individuals, regardless of their ethnicity or race, have a right to exist, interact, and thrive in our communities. When public spaces are designed to accommodate a variety of cultural expressions, they contribute to dismantling systemic prejudices and fostering an environment of acceptance and equality.

“The Big Welcome,” an adaptation of words by Kate Morales, epitomizes the essence of public spaces in welcoming individuals of all backgrounds. It acknowledges their culture, ethnicity, religion, and gender, emphasizing that everyone is welcome, and their unique identities are celebrated.

Amin Maalouf’s idea of heritage highlights the role of culture in constructing a sense of belonging. People carry their heritage with them, whether in the form of names, languages, rituals, or memories. These portable emblems of the past lend continuity to new homes and serve as a connection to one’s roots.

Identity, deeply rooted in cultural memory, is maintained through collective self-images, rites, monuments, and institutional communication. Maurice Halbwachs’ concept of fixed points and figures of memory underlines the significance of cultural objectivation in preserving and stabilizing cultural memory.

In a rapidly changing world, our identities and the spaces we inhabit must reflect the richness of human diversity. Public spaces stand as the physical embodiment of our commitment to antiracism, where all individuals can embrace their identity and find their place in a world that values and celebrates the full spectrum of human experiences. As Maya Angelou wisely noted, “If we try and understand each other, we may even become friends.” It is this understanding and acceptance, fostered by public spaces, that will lead us toward a more harmonious and inclusive future.

 

* References

  • Angelou, Maya. “Wouldn’t Take Nothing for My Journey Now.” Bantam, 1993
  • Jacobs, Jane. “The Death and Life of Great American Cities.” Vintage, 1992.
  • Davis, Angela Y. “Freedom is a Constant Struggle.” Haymarket Books, 2016.
  • Maalouf, Amin. “In the Name of Identity: Violence and the Need to Belong.” Penguin, 2001.
  • Morales, Kate. “The Big Welcome,” adapted from Mycelium School (2013-2016), in “Slow Spatial Reader: Chronicles of Radical Affection,” edited by Carolyn F. Strauss, Valiz, 2021.
  • Lowenthal, David. “The Past is a Foreign Country.” Cambridge University Press, 1985.
  • Halbwachs, Maurice. “On Collective Memory.” University of Chicago Press, 1992.
  • Wilhelm Reich, “Listen, Little Man!”, The Noonday Press, 1948

Photo: Konstantina Chrysostomou, 2016

Words of:

Konstantina Chrysostomou

Publication date:

13/10/2023

Originally written in:

english

Tags:

Everyday life / Public space

Study for the Incorporation of the gender perspective in the implementation and design of municipal facilities in Barcelona


Study for the Incorporation of the gender perspective in the implementation and design of municipal facilities in Barcelona

Public space and municipal facilities – which are part of this space of public use – are not gender-neutral. There is a gender gap in the use of municipal services and facilities. In other words, women and men experience the city and make differential use of municipal services and facilities, depending on traditional roles and gender inequalities that derive from them and condition their daily lives.

This study aims to incorporate a gender perspective in the design, implementation, and management of facilities in the city of Barcelona. Specifically, the study seeks to help reverse the gender gap in the use of municipal services and facilities and contribute to (re)thinking these spaces to make them more inclusive and egalitarian.

In this sense, the following are offered:

  • Recommendations to incorporate a gender perspective and carry out a feminist transformation of existing municipal facilities.
  • Recommendations to incorporate a gender perspective in newly constructed municipal facilities.
  • Specific recommendations for a feminist transformation of municipal restrooms, changing rooms, and nurseries.

With this in mind, seven types of municipal facilities are analyzed:

  • Sports facilities
  • Youth facilities
  • Children’s facilities
  • Facilities for the elderly
  • Social care and inclusion facilities
  • Commercial facilities
  • Cultural facilities, including libraries

For each type of facility, particular elements, both interior and exterior, are studied that potentially may generate differential use by gender or different user experiences. The objective is to identify possible obstacles and discriminations and propose alternatives to reverse them from a gender perspective.

Place

Barcelona

[1,620,343 inhabitants]

Scale

Municipal

Type of project

Urban Strategies

Urban pedagogy

Duration

24 months [2019-2021]

Promoter

Barcelona City Council’s

Department of Gender

Services and Times Policies

 

Team

*estel (Alba Domínguez Ferrer,

Konstantina Chrysostomou,

Marc Deu Ferrer, Arnau Boix i

Pla)

Ana Paricio

 

Collaborators

Municipal agents (Departament

de Transversalitat de Gènere,

Departament de Prospectiva –

Model Urbà – d’Ecologia Urbana,

Institut Municipal de Persones

amb Discapacitat, Departament

d’Atenció Social a la Família i la

Infància, Departament de

Joventut, Coordinació de l’Espai

Jove Garcilaso, Institut

Municipal Barcelona Esports –

Direcció de Serveis

d’Instal·lacions i Obres, Punt

d’Informació i Atenció a les

Dones, Institut de Cultura de

Barcelona, Direcció de Cultura de

Proximitat)

Study

Read the full study at bcnroc

 

Press

Read more about the project

at the www.barcelona.cat